The Tana website uses cookies to improve the user experience. Read more here.
Accept
Recycling ProcessesWaste Screening Technologies

Waste screening technologies

The common screening technologies used nowadays include drum screens (or trommel screens or rotary screens), disc screens, and vibrating screens. In waste processing, drum and disc screens are most common, as vibrating screens have rather limited and specific uses mainly in screening aggregates.

 

TANA’s screening product portfolio

TANA’s product portfolio includes drum screens and disc screens. Both technologies have their advantages, which are explained below. Drum screens are by design reliable and fuel efficient but TANA’s smart drum screen has been further developed with load sensing hydraulics, mechanical innovations, and intelligent information management (TANA SMART SITE™) to streamline the process and make the screen even more reliable.

Whereas drum screens have limited use areas, disc screens can process any material. TANA’s disc screens use a patented Ecostar anti-clogging system, which enables trouble-free screening of almost any material without the wrapping and plugging that would quickly clog and blind conventional screening equipment.

 

Drum screens

A drum screen is a mechanically robust, reliable, and easy-to-use machine as it has only a few moving parts. Also, the fuel consumption is low, making a drum screen a viable choice for certain waste types. It is best suited for screening compost, earth, wood, light construction waste, biomass, and sand, for instance. As the structure of the machine is simple, it is also affordable and easy to service. However, a drum screen is rather a heavy machine with a fixed end-product size (not adjustable), and possible clogging and blinding of the mesh with certain waste types might occur. Read more about the TANA drum screen.

Drum screen operation principle

Drum screen operation principle.


Disc screens

Disc screens are capable of screening almost any material, and they are particularly good for waste processing. Applications of disc screens are almost limitless: wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), industrial and commercial waste, compost, ash, metals, refuse-derived fuel (RDF), car fluff, tires, aggregates, and so forth. In addition, a disc screen takes less space than a drum screen. A 6–9 feet (2–3 meter) disc screen performs the same job as a 16–19 feet (5–6 meter) equivalent drum screen. TANA’s mobile disc screens use a patented Ecostar anti-clogging system, which enables trouble-free screening of difficult materials without the wrapping and plugging that would quickly clog and blind conventional screening equipment. Read more about the TANA disc screen.


Disc screen operation principle
Disc screen operation principle.

 

Vibrating screens

Vibrating screens have rather limited and specific uses; they are mainly used to screen aggregates. In addition, vibrating screens are rather expensive. They are not as reliable as other screening solutions and they have a relatively high fuel consumption. Thus, TANA does not have vibrating screens in its product portfolio.


History of screening

Screening techniques date back to 4000 to 3000BC for screening and sieving cereals. During the second industrial revolution in the 19th century, machines were developed for more efficient screening of soil during the gold rush. Nowadays, screening is an essential part of waste management and it enables the recovery and recycling of valuable materials as well as the processing of waste to fuel, such as tire-derived fuel (TDF), for instance.


Trommel screen operation principle 

Trommel screen (drum screen) operation principle. Read more in Wikipedia.


Before a company can profit from recycling and material recovery, waste must first be processed. Screening is an important step in this process.


Learn more about TANA screens